Home > acting, money, travel, writing > Fringe By The Numbers: My Reactions

Fringe By The Numbers: My Reactions

!
!

My last post, A First Fringe Tour: By The Numbers, already has the second most hits of anything I’ve posted onto my blog. Thank you everyone for your responses and for sharing it around. Here are my own thoughts:

!
!

* * * * *

Yes, I lost money. A fair chunk of change. 1,671.16$ , to be precise. But I’ve been spending money on learning experiences for a number of years now, beginning with seven years of university, followed by the National Voice Intensive last year, and now, this tour. Was I hoping to at least break even? Of course! But to take a wider view, I traveled to amazing cities I’d never visited, had grand adventures, even kissed a lady or two, and got to tell a story worth telling to hundreds of people (okay, 534 people + ushers + technicians) across the country.

For my own personal growth, I desperately needed to travel. It was all 100% worth it. Over the course of two and a half short months, I learned a heck of a lot about theatre, life, and myself, and I can’t wait to get back out there next summer (if the Fringe lotteries are willing to let me).

!
!

The Hatter @ Nuit Blanche in London, ON* * * * *

As a former professor once told me as he suffered through the first couple of years of his own theatre company, it’s not at all uncommon for businesses to lose money for their first two or three years of operation. This was my first ever tour. Hopefully now I have a tiny base of fans in each city, who might possibly come out and see a show of mine in the future!

!
!

* * * * *

In each city, to keep this numerical, I think I knew 1 (London), 3 (Ottawa), many (Toronto), and 1 (Saskatoon) people, respectively. No hometown advantage for me.

!
!

* * * * *

Hey Fringe Festival volunteers! You know how you happily exclaim to audience line-ups about how lovely it is that you haven’t raised your ticket price from 10$ for the past fifteen years or so? Well, inflation exists, and what you’re telling artists is that they’ve been earning less and less per ticket for every year for the past decade and a half.

I did not once hear a single complaint on the street or in the theatre about Saskatoon’s 12$/14$ ticket prices. Just sayin’.

!
!

* * * * *

Also, it’s interesting that even with a 2$ administrative fee and GST being factored in somewhere, I still came out earning 11.20$ per ticket in Saskatoon, compared to 9.94$ in London, 9.35$ in Ottawa, and a mere 8.92$ per ticket in Toronto.

!
!

* * * * *

Speaking of which, that shortfall in Toronto exists almost entirely due to the five-pack and ten-pack deals in that city. While I love having frequent fringer packs exist, compare Toronto’s 7.5$ tickets to Vancouver’s frequent fringer packs, which still offer 9$ per ticket to the performer. Seriously consider raising those frequent fringer rates, Toronto. You certainly have a reputation as being a place where performers don’t make any money. I enjoyed my time in the city, but 7.5$ tickets are hurting your reputation and hurting a performer’s chances of being able to break even in your city.

!
!

* * * * *Hatter Poster - Toronto - for printer 2

Every city is so different when trying to figure out the right number of flyers and posters. Before I set out, I pre-printed 25 posters and 500 business card flyers for each city. Rookie mistake, as I learned when I saw other performers in London editing their poster files for upcoming cities so as to include London review quotes. Come Saskatoon I finally began taping quotes onto my posters, but printing posters for each upcoming city as I go seems to be the smarter solution.

So what are the right numbers? Well, 25 posters and 500 business cards felt alright for a sleepy Fringe like London, but I could probably have put up 75 posters in Ottawa, whereas getting 25 posters up in Toronto in anywhere worth looking, proved difficult. Also in Toronto, I ran out of flyers before the fringe was half over – I could probably have handed out 1500. As an experiment, I brought 1000 flyers to Saskatoon, and despite the Fringe’s smaller size, still gave out most of them. So every city is different, and I’ve still more to learn! (It also makes a difference as to how many people you have out there, flyering – being on my lonesome can be a downside when it comes to talking up enough lines to find an audience.)

!
!

* * * * *

I gotta admit, it was disappointing to be one of 36 shows in Toronto not reviewed by Now Magazine. A few ‘N’s might have helped! (For a few more numbers, there were 148 shows in the Toronto Fringe Festival this year. 112 of them received a Now Magazine blurb and set (or lack thereof) of shiny ‘N’s.)

!
!

* * * * *

In London, I recall one performer saying that two or three days before the festival opened, they visited Tourism London to ask for Fringe information, and the person there had no idea the festival was even happening. At Nuit Blanche, I (in full Hatter garb) was asked by several people when the Fringe Festival was beginning. That was the second-to-last night of the festival. It seems London is a hard place to get word out about the festival, which was evidenced by my having zero advance ticket sales, compared to 9 in Ottawa, 23 in Toronto, and 15 in Saskatoon. Toronto is very much more of an advance ticket city than the others – perhaps there’s more of a traditional theatre-going habit there? Or is there less financial disincentive to buy advance tickets in Toronto (when compared to additional fees other festivals add onto advance ticket purchases)?

!
!

The Hat* * * * *

I’m honestly impressed with myself that I was able to keep my grocery bills down to size, even while on tour. Chalk it up to a combination of kind billets, hunts for grocery stores, and restraint whenever out and about with fellow performers. You guys feel free to order your meals at the bar; I’ll just wait until I get back to the food I bought with my big grocery trips on the day before each festival began.

!
!

* * * * *

I didn’t have nearly as strong a show at the beginning of June as I did come mid-August. To be honest, it took me until Toronto to figure out the core of what the show was about – a man trying to get home – and so my show pitches for line-ups weren’t great for the first 2/3rds of my tour. Please don’t take any of the above as me making excuses for perhaps not being as financially successful as I would have preferred: I fully accept my tour as it was.

!
!

Which is to say, a brilliant, daring adventure. :)

!
!

For another view into my time on the fringe, as well as my original By The Numbers post, I also put up a By The Emotions post which you might enjoy.

As with before, if you think any of this may be helpful to someone out there, please share it on! I hope these posts are worthwhile for someone else out there. And if you have any reactions of your own, please add them to the comments below!

!
!

Happy Fringing!

!
!

Cheers,
Andrew Wade

!
!
About these ads
  1. D'Arcy
    September 7, 2013 at 21:20

    This is an awesome post with tons of honest insight from someone who I know is genuinely in love with performance and theatre!

    • September 7, 2013 at 21:20

      Thanks, D’Arcy!

  2. Becca
    September 8, 2013 at 13:53

    Glad you found a summer a memorable one and a great learning experience. So proud of you and all you accomplish even if it doesnt show up in your wallet. Love you :)

  3. September 9, 2013 at 08:45

    Agree about the ticket prices. People can handle a few bucks more by now.

    I was stunned by London’s lack of marketing and outreach when I was there in 2011, so not at all surprised to hear about Tourism London. The entire marketing plan seemed to consist of dropping off piles of programs at local businesses to gather dust. I frequently patronized businesses downtown, told staff I was there for the Fringe, and every time (EVERY time) was asked “what’s that?”. You’d think for a city that size, a festival like this would be on the radar. I hope they’ve at least been *trying* to increase awareness since then. There seems to be marginally more press coming out of there than there was?

    Did the City of London go around and pull down everyone’s posters mid-festival this time? Because that was real fun, and it apparently wasn’t the first year it had happened.

    My understanding about most London theatre-goers is that they’re interested in the season of programming at the Grand, and that’s it. The Grand, for its part, was not supportive of Fringe. They allegedly jacked up the rent on the space used as a Fringe venue one year, and the year I was there they held a big annual fundraiser up against the Fringe. It’s the opposite of what you’d get in Winnipeg, where the large theatre – MTC – actually ran the Fringe, so you’d get support and cross-patronizing from real theatre fans.

    (Sorry about the lack of NOW review, fwiw.)

    • September 10, 2013 at 02:06

      Hah! No worries! Aye, every city has its advantages and its things-to-work-on. London’s biggest advantage appears to be Jayson McDonald. :)

      The city DID provide excellent ‘conference’ bus passes to all performers, though. I appreciated that.

  4. -K.
    September 9, 2013 at 12:33

    Wonderful. Thank you for sharing all these thoughts. A very good point about ticket prices. I suppose there’d always be that fear that they’re making theatre inaccessible by raising prices even a couple of bucks… but if the only tenuous hold you have on your Fringe-going public is crazy-cheap tickets, there’s a bigger problem at work.

    • September 10, 2013 at 02:04

      I agree! I would argue that finding ways for the mid-level artists to earn enough of a living to keep doing it, so that the overall work improves, should also be a good way to improve audience retention. :)

  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 27 other followers